More women in line to become future leaders of police

​More women than men have passed a rigorous assessment to become future leaders of the service in a first for UK policing.

A total of 780 officers from across the UK applied to take part in the High Potential Development Scheme (HPDS), designed to develop the most talented individuals to become police leaders of the future.

The five-year scheme has 55 places, with 28 going to women for the 2014 intake.

It is the first time that more women than men have successfully gained a place on the scheme, and the first time that the representation of women has reflected the wider UK population.

Of the women who took part in the application process, 62 per cent were successful, compared with 34 per cent of men.

There were 52 candidates from a white background and three from black and minority ethnic (BME) backgrounds. BME candidates made up more than five per cent of this year's intake, which is comparable to the representation of BME officers in the service.

In addition to the HPDS, more than 550 officers were successful in the latest round of exams for promotion from sergeant to inspector.

A total of 1,562 officers from 44 forces took the exam, and last month 557 were told they were successful.

College of Policing Senior Psychologist, Helen Slimmon, said:

"With fewer promotional opportunities within forces, it is critical we have the best leaders possible for the future.

"We are committed to offering continuing professional development within policing. I would like to congratulate those officers who were successful and wish them every success in the next stage in their career."

For more information on the role we play in education and developing officers, visit our Learning and development section.

This article appears in the January 2014 edition of our newsletter.

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