13 November 2017

College media mentions in the last seven days

There have been a number of media articles referencing the College over the last week. Here is a summary of the coverage:

​Friday, 10 November:

Next year's SCC will be the most diverse for a decade – and the College is promising to build on the progress made – Police Professional
The number of black and minority ethnic (BME) and police staff candidates quadrupled for the 2018 Strategic Command Course (SCC) – making it the most diverse in a decade.
Jo Noakes, SCC director for the College of Policing, told Police Professional: "It is greatly encouraging that next year's Strategic Command Course will have the highest representation of female and BME students seen over the last decade.
"However, we recognise that it is vital that we keep up this momentum through our review of Senior PNAC (Police National Assessment Centre) and the SCC and we are determined to build on the progress that has already been made."

College of Policing signs up to evidence Magna Carta – Police Oracle (behind paywall)
Chief Constable Ian Hopkins, a College of Policing board member, signed the document which will be used to inform the organisation's training and commitment to evidence based practice.
He said: "Evidence is at the heart of what the College of Policing does and what is represents. It is being used to ensure standards in police are based on knowledge of what works, rather than what has always been done.
"It is translated into guidance to enable everyone in policing to make more informed decisions.
"And it informs our training so we can develop our people to meet the challenges policing in the future will bring."

Thursday, 9 November:

Police look into deaths in custody following publication of report – Farnham Herald
Officers have responded to a national report into deaths in police custody released last week, outlining how they will work to support staff.

Leicestershire Police appoint a new deputy chief constable – Rutland and Stamford Mercury
Rob Nixon, currently an assistant chief constable with Leicestershire Police is to take over the deputy chief constable role.
Chief Constable of the force Simon Cole said: "Rob came through a tough field of candidates during a process which included a community panel, and interview board with myself, the police and the Crime Commissioner, the director of HR and an independent panel member appointed via the College of Policing."

Wednesday, 8 November:

Former chief turned HMI announced as new CEO if College - Police Oracle (behind paywall)
Article covers Mr Cunningham leading Staffs Police from 2009-2014, that his start date has not yet been announced and Rachel Tuffin will continue as CEO in the interim. It summaries the College having introduced the code of ethics, led on direct entry and the programme to turn policing into a graduate profession. Last week's PCC criticism of the length of time the appointment has taken and PCC Paddy Tipping saying that the College is not "owned by the whole of policing" are referenced, as is the NPCC call to halt PEQF on promotions. Millie Bannajee, Amber Rudd and Steve White, Police Federation are quoted, as is Mr Cunningham:

"Over the last few years the College has established itself at the heart of the reform agenda for policing.

"In this next stage, the challenge is to move that on so that all those working across policing have a clear understanding of how the College connects and supports them to deliver a service to the public.

"Policing faces a future of increasing and changing demand. The College has a major contribution to make in supporting the service, helping leaders at all levels work through the challenges, and developing a workforce that is well equipped to do the job asked of them."

Pledge to prove how it 'connects and supports' member made by New College CEO - Police Professional
Mr Cunningham's career is summarised. There is reference to: an inspection of the College last year that found limited progress in how it is recognised and respected by the rank and file; the Police Federation asking the College to "double down" on its efforts to engage with officers and explain its goals; and PCC Paddy Tipping saying the college does not feel like it is owned by officers. Amber Rudd, Sara Thornton and David Lloyd, APCC Chair are all quoted. Mr Cunningham is quoted:

"I am delighted to be joining the College of Policing as its chief executive officer. "Over the last few years the college has established itself at the heart of the reform agenda for policing. "In this next stage, the challenge is to move that on so that all those working across policing have a clear understanding of how the college connects and supports them to deliver a service to the public."

College of Policing head named as former Staffordshire Police chief - Shropshire Star
Mike Cunningham has been appointed as chief executive of the police professional standards body. There is a summary of Mr Cunningham's career. The College's tweet announcing the appointment is embedded in the article. It goes on to describe the College as "set up to act as the professional body for those working in the police service in England and Wales. It collates and produces research on crime reduction tactics and sets standards of professional practice for forces in a range of areas including armed policing, digital investigations and stop and search". Amber Rudd is mentioned as welcoming the appointment. Mr Cunningham is quoted in the text:

"I am delighted to be joining the College of Policing as its chief executive officer. Over the last few years the college has established itself at the heart of the reform agenda for policing.

"Policing faces a future of increasing and changing demand. The college has a major contribution to make in supporting the service, helping leaders at all levels work through the challenges, and developing a workforce that is well equipped to do the job asked of them."

An evidence 'magna carter' – Police Professional
Yesterday, professional bodies – including the College of Policing - signed a declaration that commits them to promote and use evidence to improve outcomes. Its author, Professor Jonathan Shepherd, explains why this commitment is so important. Also in Schools Week.

Chief who led Edward Heath investigation over child abuse claims is set to quit - Daily Mail
Further coverage of yesterday's Times article. Mike Veale, head of Wiltshire police, wants to leave the force after 33 years. He was criticised for his handling of the widely discredited probe into Heath. The article says Mr Veale described the inquiry's findings as a 'watershed moment' for victims of child abuse but has since believed to have become frustrated by a lack of support from within the police. One source said that he felt that he had been 'hung out to dry'. College is mentioned by a Wilts Police spokesperson is relation to Mr Veale reportedly telling colleagues that he had applied for a position helping to run a strategic command course.

'Home-grown' DCC appointed by force – Police Professional
Assistant Chief Constable Rob Nixon will succeed Roger Bannister when he retires from Leicestershire Police in February. College is mentioned in CC Simon Cole's quote as the recruitment process had an independent panel member appointed via the College of Policing. Also in the Rutland & Stamford Mercury. Also in Police Oracle (behind paywall) but no mention of College).

Tuesday, 7 November:

Heath sex inquiry police chief to quit with £2m pension – The Times (behind paywall)
Mike Veale, head of Wiltshire police, is said to have told colleagues that he is looking for a way out of the police after 33 years' service. He is said to have applied, before the release of the Heath report, for a role helping to run the annual strategic command course. The College is mentioned in the Wilts Police spokespersons quote and in the article as running the strategic command course.

Police failing victims of "honour" crimes, with only 5% of crimes reported to police referred to CPS – The Guardian
A leading charity has warned police in the UK are failing the victims of 'honour' based violence, forced marriage and FGM. Wendy Williams, HMIC, mentions the College in her quote about recommendations they made aimed at improving practice in relation to such victims. A further mention of the College is made saying it has published guidance for forces around "honour" crimes and is in ongoing discussions about reviewing risk assessments for these types of crimes.

17 child 'sexting' cases investigated every day a 'Worrying upward trend' – Police Professional
National Police Chiefs' Council confirmed forces recorded 6,238 underage 'sexting' offences in 2016/17 – equivalent to 17 a day. Since 2014/15, there has been a 131 per cent increase. The College's David Tucker is quoted saying: "Today's statistics indicate policing's commitment to recording all cases as crimes and focusing on safeguarding children and young people.

"It is clear that where children and young people are being exploited, forced or coerced into sharing or generating indecent imagery of themselves and/or others, the offenders should be prosecuted.

"Our advice takes into consideration that some young people send each other these types of images not realising they are breaking the law. In these circumstances the advice is to consider the long-term impact, and avoid stigmatising or unnecessarily criminalising young people. Police powers, including prosecution, should be used only when necessary and in a proportionate way."

Huge rise in the number of sexting cases reported to police – Police Oracle (behind paywall)
Chief Constable Simon Bailey, the NPCC lead for child protection, has said he believes a lack of sex education is a factor in the increase in sexting cases. The College's David Tucker is quoted saying: "It is clear that where children and young people are being exploited, forced or coerced into sharing or generating indecent imagery of themselves and/or others, the offenders should be prosecuted.

"Our advice takes into consideration that some young people send each other these types of images not realising they are breaking the law. In these circumstances the advice is to consider the long-term impact, and avoid stigmatising or unnecessarily criminalising young people. Police powers, including prosecution, should be used only when necessary and in a proportionate way."

Can rural policing be improved? – Rural Services Network
An article on what more can be done to get rural policing on the agenda. It references the College's creation in 2012 and uses statistics from the College's demand analysis report.

Police staff member secures College of Policing Bursary - Chelmsford Weekly News
Joanne Traynor, 48, a communications supervisor who has worked for Essex Police for over 20 years, has successfully secured a £5,000 bursary from the College of Policing. The bursary will help research procedures within Essex police force control room and she is enrolled on a PhD at Anglia Ruskin University.

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